We've all driven through rural areas and taken in the silent beauty of the vast landscape, homes, farms spread out over acres, and of course, the iconic red barns.  Or maybe you live in a rural area, and these views are an everyday part of your life.

It's certainly quintessential New England.

Bluebonnet Trail Barn on the Hill, Near Ennis Texas
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I've seen enormous stars in various colors on barns here and there, and always thought of them as lovely decorations. However, when I started seeing these gigantic stars painted or made of wood, metal, or quilts on almost every barn I ran across, it seemed awfully coincidental.

I knew there must be more to this around New Hampshire, Maine, and Massachusetts as well as around New England and New York.

Quilt on red barn
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It turns out it's a trend all over rural America. According to the Taste of Home website, the barn star originated from German-American and Dutch-American settlers to ward off evil and bring good luck to farmers. Taste of Home says they're known as Pennsylvania stars or primitive stars, and the color matters, too.

Star Barn
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A brown star symbolizes friendship and strength, while white stars stand for purity and energy, according to Taste of Home.

Meanwhile, if you see a purple star, that's considered holy, while a green star symbolizes hope for growth and fertility.

A blue or black star is all about protecting your farm, and if you see a yellow star, Taste of Home says that means love for your fellow man and the sun. I love knowing this, and hope that you do too.

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